Monday, October 25, 2010

The Case of Fruity and Wild Rice Salad

Fruity and Wild Rice Salad

3/4 cup wild rice
3/4 cup brown rice
4 cups water
4 rounded tsps (for 4 cups) vegetable bouillon powder
1/3 cup green onions, chopped
1/3 cup dried cranberries
1/3 cup dried apricots, chopped
1/3 cup fresh parsley, chopped
1 tsp garlic, minced
Olive Oil and Lemon Vinaigrette

In a covered pot, simmer the wild rice, brown rice, water and vegetable bouillon powder for 50 min. Drain in a strainer (there won't be much to drain off) and let cool. Toss with the green onions, dried cranberries, dried apricots, fresh parsley, garlic, and Olive Oil and Lemon Vinaigrette. Chill. When serving, pack into a cup measure, then un-mould onto plates. Serves 4.

Thursday, October 14, 2010

The Case of Cabbage Rolls

Secret agent – vegetable bouillon powder.
  • Faster and easier than making vegetable bouillon from scratch.
  • Strength of bouillon increased just by adding more vegetable bouillon powder.
  • Always on hand on kitchen shelf.
  • Mixes with many ingredients other than water, such as diced tomatoes.
Earlier, a reader was justifiably concerned  by the "salt and grime" vegetable bouillon powder can contain, and I promised to come up with an "easy, quick, and always-on-hand alternative". Ta da! Organic vegetable bouillon powder. Not trying to be smart. Compare ingredient lists.

Knorr Vegetable Instant Stock Mix
Corn syrup solids, salt, hydrolyzed soy/corn protein, monosodium glutamate, natural flavour, dried vegetables (tomatoes, onions, carrots, garlic), canola oil, tricalcium phosphate, colour, herb & spices, dried parsley, disodium guanylate, disodium inosinate, wheat maltodextrin, silicon dioxide, corn starch, colour and sulphites. May contain milk and eggs.

Harvest Sun Organic Vegetable Bouillon Powder
Yeast extract, sea salt, starch* (potato*, corn*), anticaking agent calcium carbonate, carrots*, leek*, non-hydrogenated palm oil*, celery*, parsley*, turmeric*, nutmeg*
*organic

And regarding salt content, the more vegetable bouillon powder in a recipe, the less salt is needed. Found a HUGE selection of organic vegetable bouillon powders at the GTA health food store I visited.

Cabbage Rolls

1 cabbage, frozen, then thawed overnight in a colander in the sink
1 cup TVP (textured vegetable protein) granules
2 tbsps ketchup
1/2 tsp thyme
1 tsp chilli powder
1/4 tsp pepper
3/4 tsp salt
1 rounded tsp (for 1 cup) vegetable bouillon powder
1 cup boiling water
2 onions, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 red pepper, chopped
2 tsps olive oil
2-1/2 cups cooked rice
1/4 cup nutritional yeast flakes
2 eggs
48 oz tomato juice

Cut out the core of the cabbage. Peel back the outer leaves one by one, discarding the blemished ones. Cut the thick part of the central rib out of each leaf. Continue until you have 12 leaves. In a large bowl, combine the TVP granules, ketchup, thyme, chilli powder, pepper, salt and vegetable bouillon powder. Pour on the boiling water and stir. Set aside for 15 min. Sauté the onions, garlic and red pepper in the olive oil for 8 - 10 min., until the onions are browned, adding a little water if the vegetables get too dry. Combine the onion mixture, rice, nutritional yeast flakes and eggs with the TVP granules. Preheat oven to 350ºF. Spread some of the tomato juice in the bottom of a 9" X 13" baking dish. Divide the stuffing between the cabbage leaves and roll them up. (I overlap the stem ends of each leaf where the rib's been cut out, pile my stuffing there, roll 3/4 of a turn, fold in the sides, then continue to roll.) Place the packages seam down in the baking dish. Top with the rest of the tomato juice, cover and bake for 1-1/2 hours. Serves 6.

Thursday, October 7, 2010

The Case of Thanksgiving

Just got the best surprise. Peeked at my Blogger stats, and this blog's had hits from Canada, the United States, Peru (thank you Carlos), Colombia, Australia, Belgium, Denmark, Thailand, and Vietnam. OMG! Now it's hard to feel isolated in Black Currant Bay. Instead I feel plugged in. And for that I'm grateful.

Gratitude is the name of the game here on October 11th – Thanksgiving. Even if I beef (interesting choice of words for a vegetarian) a little now and then, I truly do appreciate what I have. Especially the people in my life. Thank you Karl, for loving me. Thank you Anne and Stephen, dear sister and brother. Thank you Kathleen and France, Superfriends. Thanks Gina. Daughter I'll never have? Thanks Mom, who even though dearly departed, has never really left me. And thank you readers. HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

Friday, October 1, 2010

The Case of Greek Omelette

See, this is how it is – I make the food, I take pictures of the food, then I eat the food, so my blog is more a what I'm eating rather than a what I propose to eat. And since Karl was away at a conference, and I was super-determined to eat decently even if I was alone, I made myself this omelette.

Greek Omelette

2 eggs
1 tsp butter
1/4 onion, chopped
1/2 cup Greek olives, pitted
1/2 cup grape tomatoes, the larger ones halved
1/8 cup feta, chopped
1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped

Beat the eggs. Over medium heat, melt the butter in an omelette pan and coat the bottom and sides. When a drop of water sizzles in the butter, pour in the eggs and swirl to coat the bottom and sides of the pan. When the eggs are partially set, lift the edges to allow the egg mixture to flow underneath. When the eggs are almost set, sprinkle on the onion, olives, tomatoes and feta. When the bottom is golden, and the top is set, fold the omelette and slide it onto a plate. Sprinkle with the parsley. Serves 1.